The Daily Lithograph

If I'm making it, writing it, reading about it, or thinking particularly hard about it, you'll see it here first.

Running Reviews: Lauryn Hill, “The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill”

Album

Lauren Hill, The Miseducation of Lauren Hill  (1997)

Run

5.4 miles, 50 minutes

Conditions: 65 F, sunny, hungry, thirsty, and a little lost

I haven’t done one of these in a while, so I thought I’d check out one of the many, many albums I picked up on Record Store Day. The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill was one of my more confident purchases: Hill comes well-recommended, not the least by a certain admirer.

On the spectrum of rap to R&B, Hill errs on the side of downtempto blues on this one, with the drum machine being the vestigial hip-hop influence on some tracks. I’m not much of a modern R&B guy, but Hill’s rich vocals with gratuitous chorus and layering make a compelling argument. Frankly, I found the spoken tracks a bit less intriguing, though Hill is plenty competent spitting on the mic. The tracks that showcase both rap and a soul chorus are where everything comes together, and it becomes clear why this was the first hip-hop Best Album at the Grammies. 

The beats on the album are interesting, though besides riffs from traditional instruments they don’t really stand out on their own. I suppose this was pretty standard for 90s hip-hop. Thinking back, though, I think a lot of recent tracks with this stellar grade of vocals can live off pretty minimal production.

I didn’t really like it as a running album; there’s pep on a few of the tracks, but, on average, they’re a lot slower and jazzier. I think the ideal activity for listening would be getting home from work and making a three-course meal from a recipe you haven’t tried before, then setting a table for yourself and a very special lady. It’s busy, well-cultured, cool and empowering, and overall, absolutely gorgeous.

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 
The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.
An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.
For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.
It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.
That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.
This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…
(Read Full Text)

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 

The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.

An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.

For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.

It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.

That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.

This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…

(Read Full Text)

(via mechagod)

dogbomber:

Mineral Monsters

Decided to toss them all into a photoset for convenience. It was a fun week!

Sources: Mineralists, Friends of Minerals Forum, Wikipedia Creative Commons, You Flaming Brute

(via mechagod)

gastrophobia:

vanderbeam:

benpaddon:

tallestsilver:

pumpkinappearifier:

darrynek:

is this supposed to change my mind because it didn’t



And yet the spelling reflects the pronunciation we’re NOT supposed to use?

I’ll pronounce it “JIF” when we start saying “Jraphics”. Until then, GIF gets a soft G from me.

i have always pronounced it “jif,” until recently, when i relented, not because i was wrong but because i was tired of being corrected."when they came for the socialists, i did not speak out,"
Holy shit, the inventor of the gif doesn’t know how to pronounce gif! D:

The first letter isn’t for Graphics, it stands for Generated, so yeah, it’s obviously a j sound

gastrophobia:

vanderbeam:

benpaddon:

tallestsilver:

pumpkinappearifier:

darrynek:

is this supposed to change my mind because it didn’t

And yet the spelling reflects the pronunciation we’re NOT supposed to use?

I’ll pronounce it “JIF” when we start saying “Jraphics”. Until then, GIF gets a soft G from me.

i have always pronounced it “jif,” until recently, when i relented, not because i was wrong but because i was tired of being corrected.

"when they came for the socialists, i did not speak out,"

Holy shit, the inventor of the gif doesn’t know how to pronounce gif! D:

The first letter isn’t for Graphics, it stands for Generated, so yeah, it’s obviously a j sound

(Source: panerasexual)

(Source: deskgirl, via huggs-boson)


Balmain S/S 2013
theorangeco:

Unforgiving Cold Makes for Beautiful Frozen Lighthouse Photos
Thomas Zakowski’s series of frozen lighthouse photos, showing the result of waves crashing onto these Lake Michigan lighthouses, and then quickly freezing over.

View the post: http://ornge.me/1gSmYko

theorangeco:

Unforgiving Cold Makes for Beautiful Frozen Lighthouse Photos

Thomas Zakowski’s series of frozen lighthouse photos, showing the result of waves crashing onto these Lake Michigan lighthouses, and then quickly freezing over.

View the post: http://ornge.me/1gSmYko

whimsebox:

Stacked rings created by Clive Roddy

(Source: irisnectar, via sosuperawesome)

purpleishboots:

actegratuit:

Creatures of the Mechazoic Era,

Chase Black

That is incredible art.

(via space-aged)

nicholasgurewitch:

shake it, monolith